The weirdiest homes TOP-5

Cunningham domes, Foam House, Earthship, Coral Castle & my favourite Neuschwanstein Castle all in pictures!

5. Cunningham domes
World War II veteran Gerry Cunningham intended to build an eco-friendly home with solar panels to provide electricity and wind power usage to pump groundwater. He started building his home in the early 1980s with his wife, Ann, who died in May 2009 at age 86. It took about 13 years to complete most of the work.

4. Foam House
Yes, a home made of foam! Local residents know it under the names of Mushroom House, Flintstone House or Hobbit House, but the family that built it in 1969 preferred the name “Ensculptic”.

3. Earthship
An Earthship is a type of passive solar house made of natural and recycled materials. Designed and marketed by Earthship Biotecture of Taos, New Mexico. Houses are made of recycled building materials such as old car tires and soda pop bottles, and powered by solar panels.


2. Coral Castle
A misterious complex build by a single man of Latvian origin  Edward Leedskalnin. He was jilted by his 16-year-old fiancée Agnes Scuffs in Latvia, just one day before the wedding. Edward left for the US and spent over 28 years building the Coral Castle, refusing to allow anyone to view him whilehe worked. When asked why he had built the castle, Leedskalnin would vaguely answer it was for his “Sweet Sixteen.

As the Coral Castle Museum site says, to this day, no one knows how Ed created the Coral Castle. Built under the cover of night and in secret, at a time when there were no modern construction conveniences, Ed would only say that he knew “the secret of the pyramids.”

1.Neuschwanstein Castle

My favourite building! It’s outside the US, in southern Germany. You saw it while watching Disney cartoons! The castle was a dream of  Ludwig II of Bavaria. His wishes and demands expanded during the construction of Neuschwanstein, and so did the expenses. The king paid for his construction projects by private means and from his civil list income. Even after his debts raised very high,  Ludwig II insisted on continuation of his architectural projects; he threatened suicide if his creditors seized his palaces.

Choose a house for youself!

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